<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_quote"><div dir="ltr"><div>Hi</div><div><br></div><div>By the end of 2025 I’d like both the accessibility and LaTeX communities to be working together to bring an end to ‘separate-but-equal’ production of electronic and print STEM documents. This chasm caused difficulties. More and more writers, readers and publishers know the cost of this unsolved problem.</div><div><br></div><div>TeX Hour: Thursday 5 October, 6:30 to 7:30pm BST<br>
TeX Hour URL: <a href="https://texhour.github.io/2023/10/05/2025-problems-stem-docs-web/" target="_blank">https://texhour.github.io/2023/10/05/2025-problems-stem-docs-web/</a><br>
Zoom URL: <a href="https://us02web.zoom.us/j/78551255396?pwd=cHdJN0pTTXRlRCtSd1lCTHpuWmNIUT09" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">https://us02web.zoom.us/j/78551255396?pwd=cHdJN0pTTXRlRCtSd1lCTHpuWmNIUT09</a></div><br>MathJax is a brilliant example of how both sides benefit from cooperation across the digital-print divide. They achieve their stated goal of “Beautiful and accessible math in all browsers”.<br><br>The R-Markdown tool chain is a wonderful example of a community creating multiple outputs from a single source. Output documents include presentations, websites and books. Output formats include PDF, Beamer, and accessible HTML.<br><br><div>I want this TeX Hour to focus on what else can reduce the divide, and encourage similar software, by the end of 2025. No proposal is too small or large to be considered, provided we are realistic about what can be done. More people knowing more about what’s out there would be a good start. I see LaTeX and web developers having a key role here.</div><div><br></div><div>Looking forward to better STEM documents<br></div><div><br></div><div>Jonathan</div><br></div>
</div></div>
</div></div>