<html><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">Thanks for the tips.<br><br>@Hans-Georg:<br>At the first view combinedgraphics seems to be exactly what I was searching. However, the option "vecscale" scales the figure but changes also the line thickness. So this is probably not a good solution.<br><br>@Victor<br>The solution with pgf/tikz was new to me. It is really interesting and seems to be suitable for my problem. However, I could not find a good way to adjust the size of the figure, except with the option "scale=...". I think it did not change the line thickness, which is much better than combinedgraphics. But still one cannot define the exact size with e.g. width=0.49\columnwidth.<div><br></div><div>But the graphics are really nice. They look even much better than Illustrator graphs.<br><br>@ Pete<br>This is exactly what I currently do. But it takes some time and I don't want to waste a student researcher on this boring work.<br><br>Jimi<br><br><br><br>Am 01.03.2010 um 01:11 schrieb Hans-Georg:<br><br><blockquote type="cite">Am 28.02.2010 um 23:01 schrieb Jimi <<a href="mailto:Alphapower@gmx.de">Alphapower@gmx.de</a>><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">I produce most of my figures with Gnuplot. Generally I use the same figures several times (e.g. in journals, proceedings, posters, presentations, ...). But there is a problem. If I include the figure with \includegraphics[width=...]{figname}, both the graph and the text is scaled.<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">I have seen that Gnuplot offers the possibility to generate e.g. tex+eps files. In this case, (pdf)latex scales the font in the figure according to the font size of the text. To include the "figure", I use<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">\begin{figure}[htb]<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">\input{figure}<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">\end{figure}<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">which works fine. However, I generally need to scale the graph (e.g. 1.0\textwidth, 1.0\columnwidth, ...). If I use the commands \resizebox{1.0\textwidth}{!}{\input{figure}} or<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">\scalebox{1.0\textwidth}{!}{\input{figure}}, also the text will be scaled and the advantage of using the Gnuplot terminal epslatex is lost.<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><blockquote type="cite">Is there a way to include these files (eps+tex) and to scale the figure individually?<br></blockquote></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Jimi,<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">You might test the combinedgraphics package, which is included in TeX Live 2009:<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><a href="file:///usr/local/texlive/2009/texmf-dist/doc/latex/combinedgraphics/combinedgraphics.pdf">file:///usr/local/texlive/2009/texmf-dist/doc/latex/combinedgraphics/combinedgraphics.pdf</a><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">or<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><a href="http://tug.ctan.org/tex-archive/macros/latex/contrib/combinedgraphics">http://tug.ctan.org/tex-archive/macros/latex/contrib/combinedgraphics</a><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">This package provides a macro (\includecombinedgraphics) for the inclusion of combined EPS/LATEX and PDF/LATEX graphics (an export for-mat of Gnuplot, Xfig, and maybe other programs). Instead of including the graphics with a simple \input, the \includecombinedgraphics macro has some benefits:<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"> changing the font and color of the text of the LATEX parts<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"> rescaling the graphics without affecting the font of the LATEX parts<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"> automatic inclusion of the vector graphics parts, as far as LATEX parts do not do it (e.g., for files exported from Gnuplot before version 4.2 or Xfig)<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"> rescalingandrotatingofcompletegraphics(similarto\includegraphics from graphicx package)<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">This package is quite new and comes with an alpha warning (This is alpha software and may contain serious bugs! Use with caution and on your own risk! Check output! But you have the alphapower.)<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">Hans-Georg<br></blockquote><div><br></div></div></body></html>